18/10/2017 WEEK TUTORIALS

Dear all,

This Wednesday 18 October 2017, we will be from 08:30-till we finish with all of you, in Room 3.08N.

Please define the running order by commenting to this email.

THANK YOU!

Izaskun&Carlos

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Posted in 2017-2018 | 15 Comments

ROOM BOOKINGS FOR FIRST TERM + CRITS <3!

Dear ALL! this is the room booking for the months ahead.

  • Wednesday 11 October 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 18 October 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 25 October 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 4.08N & Room 4.08S
  • Wednesday 1 November 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 8 November 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 15 November 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 22 November 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 3.08N
  • Wednesday 29 November 2017 08:00-20:00: Room 4.08N & Room 4.08S
  • Wednesday 13 December 2017, 08:00-20:00: Room 5.08
  • Wednesday 10 January 2018,  08:00-20:00: Room 2.08S & Room 2.08N 
 
Please post as comments the names of the guests you are inviting for the 30/60 min talks every Wednesday.
Thank you!
Izaskun and Carlos
 
 
Posted in 2017-2018 | Leave a comment

REFERENCE: PRECARIOUS WORKERS BRIGADE

  1. About

    We are a UK-based group of precarious workers in culture & education. We call out in solidarity with all those struggling to make a living in this climate of instability and enforced austerity.

    The PWB’s praxis springs from a shared commitment to developing research and actions that are practical, relevant and easily shared and applied. If putting an end to precarity is the social justice we seek, our political project involves developing tactics, strategies, formats, practices, dispositions, knowledges and tools for making this happen.

    Some tools that have come out of our working process can be found in the Tools section of this website. They are meant to be shared, used and developed.

    Working Themes

    Currently we are working around the following themes:

    – Labour conditions (esp in the cultural and educational sector): We have produced a number of tools to address unpaid internships and free labour, such as the Bust Your Boss Card, the ‘Surviving Internship – A Counter-Guide to Free Labour in the Arts’ (authored as Carrot Workers Collective) and open letters to institutions. We also engage in protest actions, often in conjunction with other groups/campaigns.

    – Education/’The hidden curriculum’: This working group looks at the role of higher education in the normalisation of precarity. We have produced ‘Training For Exploitation? Politicising Employability and Reclaiming Education’ – an ‘alternative curriculum’ for those finding themselves teaching ‘professional development’ modules or running work placement programmes in art/design colleges. We also do workshops with art/design students and recent graduates.

    – Institutionalized precarity and the corporatisation of the arts

    – Solidarities: We support other campaigns in solidarity, for example cleaner’s campaigns of UVW; the internship campaigns of groups like Future Interns and the International Coalition for Fair Internships; the Anti-Raids Network, which works with local communities to challenge illegal raids and the detention of migrant workers

    Find more info on our work process and ethics in the Ethics Code section of the website and in this interview.

    Join us to learn, create & struggle together!

    If you are organising a workshop, or are interested in learning more about our work please have a look through this website: You can find info to help you run your own workshop in the TOOLS section and in our ‘Counter-Guide’ and ‘Training for Exploitation?’. Or have a look at the TEXT section if you want to learn more about PWB (texts, interviews).

    E: precariousworkersbrigade@aktivix.org
    Fb: Precarious Workers Brigade
    Tw: @PWB_Carrots

    We are based at the Common House, a collectively managed space for radical groups, projects and community events in East London  www.commonhouse.org.uk                                                                                                   The Common House, Unit 5E 5 Pundersons Gardens, E2 9QG London

Posted in 2017-2018, REFERENCES | Leave a comment

CAMPAINING!! A DESIGN BASED INQUIRY INTO THE CAPACITY OF CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE EMERGING IDEOLOGIES, SOCIAL RIGHTS OR POLITICAL AND COMMERCIAL PROPAGANDA. UNIT22 BARTLETT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

CAMPAINING!!. A DESIGN BASED INQUIRY INTO THE CAPACITY OF CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE EMERGING IDEOLOGIES, SOCIAL RIGHTS OR POLITICAL AND COMMERCIAL PROPAGANDA.

UNIT 22. Carlos Jimenez Cenamor and Izaskun Chinchilla.

“The fact is too many architects are seriously marginalized, and I would go so far as to say, intentionally isolated, from the political process that determines the zoning, funding and the complex social and legal regulations that control the building of our shared environment. This subject needs to be confronted, debated and discussed in detail.”  Swett (2005)

“Architecture is never isolated but its necessity political. What counts in a building is not so much the looks but how it comes to life for people and forges lasting connections.” Klingmann (2007)

When Le Corbusier defined architecture in 1932 as ´the masterly, correct and magnificent play of masses brought together in light´ was probably trying to provide the profession, as he did, with the most famous and recognized definition of practice in the recent history. It is less probable that he could envision that what he was also accurately defining were the reasons for architects´ disconnection from society. Because architects tend to think that a good project might not take economy, ecology, socials issues, political clues, regulations and rigorous material investigation into account, because they tend to think that what it is important is what they have modeled in Rhino or put together in a model, the academic hierarchies of the profession find it really hard to actually influence more than a very, very, small proportion of the real buildings that are done around the world. Massively, cities develop without the influence of the top debates of the profession. We have lost the track: masses and light are a very small part of the problem and we have been too long thinking just about them. Unit 22 has worked eight years at the Bartlett to encourage students understand the varied -social, political, urban, financial, cultural, technical and ecological– implications of architectural design, promoting their capacity to actively engage with more citizens, with more projects in more places.    “Architecture is the masterful, correct and magnificient play of volumes brought together in light. Our eyes were made for seeing forms in light; shadow and light reveal forms; cubes, cones, spheres, cylinders and pyramid are the greatest primary forms that light reveals well; the image is clear and tangible for us, without ambiguity. That is why these are beautiful forms, the most beautiful forms.””Architecture is the masterful, correct and magnificient play of volumes brought together in light. Our eyes were made for seeing forms in light; shadow and light reveal forms; cubes, cones, spheres, cylinders and pyramid are the greatest primary forms that light reveals well; the image is clear and tangible for us, without ambiguity. That is why these are beautiful forms, the most beautiful forms.””Architecture is the masterful, correct and magnificient play of volumes brought together in light. Our eyes were made for seeing forms in light; shadow and light reveal forms; cubes, cones, spheres, cylinders and pyramid are the greatest primary forms that light reveals well; the image is clear and tangible for us, without ambiguity. That is why these are beautiful forms, the most beautiful forms.””Architecture is the masterful, correct and magnificient play of volumes brought together in light. Our eyes were made for seeing forms in light; shadow and light reveal forms; cubes, cones, spheres, cylinders and pyramid are the greatest primary forms that light reveals well; the image is clear and tangible for us, without ambiguity. That is why these are beautiful forms, the most beautiful forms.”

The political dimension of architecture will be this year our main concern, and this will constitute a strong statement. If politics is about the allocation and advancement of resources and powers in society, then political architecture begins with an awareness of architecture being complicit with politics, with financial and industrial interests, with big and small corporations, administration and public and private companies (Latour, 2005). We will start recognizing architecture’s more or less directly designated role in political regulations of society and social life. Yet what architecture can do reaches beyond deliberate politics, we expect much more from our students. Specifically, we will ask our students what architecture can do for smaller social initiatives that are trying to change things and how their design capacity can help augmenting societal resilience and find alternative paths for development. We will ask our students to find NGO´s, social initiatives, bottom up propositions around the world and to help them campaign, providing them with architectural spaces to run their activities. The first exercise of the year will be designing the HEADQUARTERS!! for the selected group of activist.

Students will reflectively applied propaganda techniques as part of their clients overall marketing and branding campaigns, when they come to constructing a central office or corporate headquarters. The headquarters will need to be the ultimate expression or symbol of that emerging company. The building has to make a statement to potential sympathetic citizens, customers, clients, employees, rivals or authorities. The architecture utilized in the student´s design should indicate general philosophies held by the corporation or principles it wishes to espouse. The design of the activist headquarters must provide citizens with a full-service experience. This will require students to expand their repertoire past the built environment, developing innovative ways to create a branded and driven by ideology experiences: we will use graphics, illustration, sound, applied video, applied video. Further development within the world of brand recognition not only extends list of objective programmatic necessities, but is also a vital factor in augmenting the impact of the supported ideology.

Unit 22 has establish a professional contact with the NGO Southall Sisters, who are in the need to renovate their own headquarters, to be able to offer a real case study for those students wanting to work with clients face to face.

In the second part of the year, we will also look at how ideologies affect LIFESTYLE!!. Buildings, just like generic products, fulfil needs, but architecture fulfils desires. Just as branded products provide representational or aspirational value, architecture provides an environment that people can relate to emotionally and make a part of their lifestyles. Architecture can also be seen as a catalyst that brands its user. It supports and boosts identity and aspirations of clients and fulfils their economic and social ambitions through new structures, interfaces and networks that facilitate growth and transformation. Architecture is in a sense a promotional medium and an identity definer. It is a medium that promotes social relationships as well as individual enterprises, and can be used as a symbol of territorial identity. That is why architecture must be understood in both its symbolic and its operational dimensions (Muratovski, 2017).

The fieldtrip will be especially important to develop this second design task. We will be traveling through Malaysia visiting places that offer meditation, vegan diets, detox experiences or yoga for western citizens. Students will be asked to investigate and observe their surrounding space during the trip with the aim to summarize, through the symbolism of form, the expression of their own distinctive content.

As a summary, we will be looking at the ability of architecture to persuade people in a plan, control and intentional way, an essentially contested concept that has many labels, such as cultural diplomacy, political communication, democracy building, propaganda, or branding.

 

BRIEF BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Klingmann, Anna. Brandscapes: architecture in the experience economy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2007.

Latour, Bruno, y Peter Weibel, eds. Making things public: atmospheres of democracy. Cambridge, Mass. : [Karlsruhe, Germany]: MIT Press ; ZKM/Center for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, 2005.

Muratovski, Gjoko, y International Research Conference: Design for Business and Industry, eds. Design for Business, 2012.

Swett, Richard N., y Colleen M. Thornton. Leadership by design: creating an architecture of trust. Atlanta, GA : [S.l.]: Greenway Communications ; Ostberg, 2005.

Photo. Lounge Presentation Space for Red.es, a public company in Spain, intended to help the digitalization of public administrations designed by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects. The branding policy of this space combines CNC produced furniture with cozy cushions and natural materials transmitting the values of the company: they want to present digitalization as an easy, user-friendly, close and simple process.

Posted in 2017-2018, AGENDA, COMMUNIQUÉS | Leave a comment

UNIT22 MEETING DATES + CRITS

Dear all!

Here you have the full list UNIT22 MEETING DATES + CRITS

Wednesday 11. October.

Wednesday 18. October.

Wednesday 25. CRIT space + 2 students hosting. 1/2 of panel selected by students.

Wednesday 1. November.

Wednesday 8. November.

Wednesday 15. November.

Wednesday 22. November.

Wednesday 29. November. CRIT space + 2 students hosting. 1/2 of panel selected by students.

Wednesday 13. December. Not Izaskun.

Wednesday 10. January. CRIT space. + 2 students hosting. 1/2 of panel selected by students.

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Tutorial List

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8. Georgina

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13. Laurence

14. Timmy

Posted in 2014-2015 | 11 Comments

Tutorial List 02.05

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2. Huma

3. Jack

4. Alex

5. Georgina

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Posted in 2014-2015 | 11 Comments